This page was printed from https://www.ifai.com

Sustainability: public engagement

October 15th, 2015 / By: / Business, Sustainability

In 2011, Glen Raven debuted Sunbrella® Renaissance, made from 50 percent reclaimed and reprocessed fiber and fabric, including some from the company’s Recycle My Sunbrella program. Photo: Glen Raven Custom Fabrics LLC.
In 2011, Glen Raven debuted Sunbrella® Renaissance, made from 50 percent reclaimed and reprocessed fiber and fabric, including some from the company’s Recycle My Sunbrella program. Photo: Glen Raven Custom Fabrics LLC.

Raising awareness of fabric recycling and re-using keeps the conversation going.

With the proliferation of social media, the general public has become accustomed to interacting with companies as well as each other. And companies increasingly appreciate the importance of being part of the larger conversation. Insularity is no longer a protection of corporate advantage. In today’s world, you had better be out there engaging with the public and with other companies.

Whether or not Twitter exchanges between Taylor Swift and Nicki Minaj benefit society, the fact remains that yesterday’s approach to communication is, well, so yesterday.

“We’ve changed the way we engage our customers over the past few years,” says Jay Hertwig, vice president of global brand sales, marketing and product development for Unifi of Greensboro, N.C. “We hope that our changes inspire others throughout the supply chain. Through our #TurnItGreen initiative, Unifi has been raising awareness about the importance of recycling and choosing products made with recycled materials. We are giving ownership to our consumers, customers, and brands in the production and purchase of sustainable products.”

For more than 25 years, Glen Raven Custom Fabrics has recycled its Sunbrella® acrylic manufacturing waste and delivered it to recyclers that converted it into industrial products such as felt, automotive insulation, and filtration. Five years ago, the Glen Raven, N.C.-based company launched its Recycle My Sunbrella program to provide customers — businesses and homeowners alike — a path to participate in the process. Some of the waste is even used to create novelty yarns in decorative Sunbrella fabrics.

Unifi’s Repreve Recycling Center in Yadkinville, N.C., processes post-industrial and post-consumer polyester waste for conversion into Repreve, a family of first-quality recycled polyester and nylon fibers. A recently installed solar farm is expected to provide about 10 percent of the energy at the center, and an addition expected to be completed in spring of 2016 will more than double the center’s size to 135,000 square feet. Photo: Unifi
Unifi’s Repreve Recycling Center in Yadkinville, N.C., processes post-industrial and post-consumer polyester waste for conversion into Repreve, a family of first-quality recycled polyester and nylon fibers. A recently installed solar farm is expected to provide about 10 percent of the energy at the center, and an addition expected to be completed in spring of 2016 will more than double the center’s size to 135,000 square feet. Photo: Unifi

“A couple of manufacturers and distributors have demonstrated the largest commitment, and we also see regular contributions from some small workshops around the country,” says John Gant, director of research and development.

“We do our best to share our values, our efforts that are tangible to each type of customer and include sustainability messaging as part of the Sunbrella brand.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Comments are moderated and will show up after being approved.